Tag: disability justice

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VIEW: Research cannot be a vehicle for reproducing disadvantage and oppression, as it has been in the past

Ableism – or discrimination against people with disabilities – has had detrimental impacts on immigration policies and immigrants, suicide rates among people with disabilities, and social acceptance and stigmatisation by society. Unfortunately, many have seen ableism have an accelerated impact during the coronavirus pandemic. In this interview, Encalada shares his views on how research can make a difference, how research has failed to help in the past, and the importance of involving people with disabilities in research programs as researchers.

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PEOPLE: Why Sharon daVanport built a support network for autistic women and nonbinary people

In 2010, Sharon daVanport founded the Autistic Women & Nonbinary Network (AWN) to build a supportive community where autistic women, girls, nonbinary people and people of all marginalised genders could share their experience in an understanding, diverse and inclusive environment. In this interview, Sharon shares how gender stereotypes can lead to a misdiagnosis, how they are maintaining and building the AWN, and their views on disability justice.

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VIEW: Why disability justice is worth fighting for

Shain Neumeier is an attorney and activist, a proud member of the disability and LGBTQ+ communities, and a passionate advocate for disability justice. In this interview, they share why disability justice is worth fighting for, the challenges society needs to overcome to achieve disability justice, and the importance of not mistaking disability justice for disability rights and ensuring it leads to fundamental changes across society.

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VIEW: Rights are necessary, but not sufficient – Lydia X. Z. Brown highlights need for disability justice

Lydia X. Z. Brown is a renowned disability justice advocate, organiser, educator, attorney, strategist, and writer. They believe in the need for communities, governments, and individuals to re-assess the way “power over” or “power against” certain groups of people, including people with disabilities, is gained and sustained. Their work and experiences with disability justice urge people to consider ableism – discrimination against people with disabilities – as more than a disability rights issue.